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Nodule

A small bump or lump under the skin.

see glossary list >
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Abscess

A collection of pus causing swelling and inflammation in the surrounding skin.

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Rupture

Forcibly tearing or bursting through the skin.

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Hair follicle

The root where hair grows.

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Chronic

Continuing or occurring again and again for a long time.

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Comorbidities

Medical conditions that appear together.

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Triglycerides

A type of fat found in the blood that might raise your risk of coronary artery disease.

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HDL cholesterol

High-Density Lipoprotein cholesterol, or “good cholesterol.” High HDL cholesterol levels are desirable, as they reduce the risk for cardiovascular (heart) disease.

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Glucose

Sugar in bloodstream, derived from carbohydrates.

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Lesion

An ulcer or sore on the skin, such as those caused by HS.

see glossary list >
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Fistula

An abnormal connection or tunnel under the skin that forms because of injury, infection or inflammation.

see glossary list >
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Sinus tract

A narrow tunnel under the skin that is open on one end and lets fluid escape or drains fluid.

see glossary list >
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Corticosteroids

A medicine used to relieve swelling, itching, and redness in the body.

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Infusion

The slow therapeutic introduction of a medication into the body via a vein.

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De-roofing

Removing the top of a cyst, sinus tract, or abscess by surgery.

see glossary list >

How to get the most out of
talking to your doctor about HS

We’ve designed this conversation guide to help you get the most out of your doctor visit. We’ve included questions about hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) that your dermatologist might ask you, along with thoughts and concerns you should share with your doctor.

Doctor Conversation Guide

Answer the questions below to create your very own conversation guide.

After you’re done, there are 2 ways to save it: as a PDF, or as an e-mail you can send to yourself. And, if you need a dermatologist, please use our Find a Derm tool.

Questions your dermatologist might ask you:

  1. When did your symptoms start? How often do you get these symptoms?
  2. If your symptoms went away, how long were they gone?
  3. Have your symptoms changed since they first appeared?
  4. Is there a history of skin disease in your family?

Select the questions that you want to ask your dermatologist:

Select the concerns you want to tell your dermatologist:

Where does it strike?

Though HS can affect men and women in different ways, there are many things they have in common. For example, symptoms usually appear in areas where you have hair and where skin rubs together, like under the arms and in the groin area. Please check off the areas below where you’re having symptoms and review with your dermatologist.

MEN

WOMEN

Create my Doctor Conversation Guide >

Save options

Your personalized Doctor Conversation Guide has been created. Please select how you would like to save it:

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