Treatment
Options for HS

As you may know, there is no cure for hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), but there are a number of treatment options that dermatologists prescribe that may give you some relief and help manage your signs and symptoms. The type of treatment your doctor recommends will depend on several factors, including the severity of your condition.

Below are some treatment options your dermatologist may discuss with you:

Prescribed by a doctor, antibiotic treatments are usually in the form of a pill or cream and are used to fight an infection.
Commonly prescribed if you have single, painful lesions
Corticosteroids are taken as a pill, or sometimes your doctor may give you a corticosteroid injection.
Injections are used to help reduce pain and swelling
Biologics are medicines that are administered as injections or infusions and prescribed by a doctor.
Prescribed if you have multiple lesions
Find out about a biologic treatment for moderate to severe HS >
Your doctor may recommend surgery for HS if:
Lesions need to be drained, separated (called de-roofing), or removed

Be sure to discuss all of your signs and symptoms with your dermatologist in order to find the best treatment option for you.

Please note

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Nodule

A small bump or lump under the skin.

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Abscess

A collection of pus causing swelling and inflammation in the surrounding skin.

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Rupture

Forcibly tearing or bursting through the skin.

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Hair follicle

The root where hair grows.

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Chronic

Continuing or occurring again and again for a long time.

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Comorbidities

Medical conditions that appear together.

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Triglycerides

A type of fat found in the blood that might raise your risk of coronary artery disease.

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HDL cholesterol

High-Density Lipoprotein cholesterol, or “good cholesterol.” High HDL cholesterol levels are desirable, as they reduce the risk for cardiovascular (heart) disease.

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Glucose

Sugar in bloodstream, derived from carbohydrates.

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Lesion

An ulcer or sore on the skin, such as those caused by HS.

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Fistula

An abnormal connection or tunnel under the skin that forms because of injury, infection or inflammation.

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Sinus tract

A narrow tunnel under the skin that is open on one end and lets fluid escape or drains fluid.

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Corticosteroids

A medicine used to relieve swelling, itching, and redness in the body.

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Infusion

The slow therapeutic introduction of a medication into the body via a vein.

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De-roofing

Removing the top of a cyst, sinus tract, or abscess by surgery.

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